Remarkable Ohio

Results for: toll-house
2663 Prairie Street
New Haven

, OH

New Haven, Ohio, was the mercantile center of southwest Huron County during the first half of the 19th century. Residents described immense wagons, or “land schooners,” lined up for miles on the New Haven-Worthington Road traveling from Columbus to the Lake Erie ports. Organized in 1815, New Haven was one of the early townships formed in Huron County and the Firelands. The village was platted, with streets at right angles around a diamond-shaped town green, after the plan of New Haven, Connecticut. When, in the 1840s, New Haven rejected the railroad’s direct route through the village, the Sandusky & Newark was routed to the west and through Plymouth taking with it the shipping business. Subsequently, New Haven began a steady economic decline into a small crossroads village.

27 Broadway St.
Toledo

, OH

Overlooking the “Middlegrounds,” an early site of railroad, immigration, and commercial activity, the Oliver House opened in 1859 as Toledo’s premier hotel. It was designed by nationally prominent architect Isaiah Rogers, in the Greek Revival style, and built by the family of William Oliver for whom the hotel was named; owner of this land, Oliver was one of Toledo’s earliest real estate investors. (Continued on other side)

80 W. State Street
Springboro

, OH

Jonathan Wright (1782-1855) and his wife Mary Bateman Wright (1787-1866) moved with their five children from Menallen, Adams County, Pennsylvania, in 1814 and built this Federal style house. Using skills acquired from his father, Joel Wright, a surveyor who platted the city of Columbus, Jonathan platted the village of “Springborough,” named for the many springs in the vicinity. The Wright family established and operated a woolen factory, two flour mills, a general store, and a 320-acre farm in the Springboro area. The Wrights were active members of the Society of Friends (Quakers) and strongly opposed slavery. The house was a station on the Underground Railroad, offering assistance to runaway slaves during their flight to freedom. Many members of the Wright family, including Jonathan, Mary, and four of their children, are buried in the Friends Cemetery on nearby Factory Road.

79 S. Sandusky Street
Delaware

, OH

Built in 1833 as a health resort named the Mansion House Hotel, Elliott Hall is noted as Ohio’s oldest collegiate Greek Revival building. The closure of the Bank of the United States and an economic panic in 1837 created nation-wide financial difficulties, which led to the decline of the luxury resort. Under the leadership of Reverend Adam Poe, minister of William Street Methodist Church, the citizens of Delaware purchased the building for the establishment of a Methodist college for men. Ohio Wesleyan University was chartered on March 7, 1842, and the founding building was named for Dr. Charles Elliott, Ohio Conference leader who helped examine the site and establish the university. In 1877, Ohio Wesleyan University and the Ohio Wesleyan Female College merged into a co-educational institution. Elliott Hall was moved to its present location in 1892 when University Hall was built.

39 West Water Street
Chillicothe

, OH

The first Northwest Territory assembly formally met in Cincinnati in September 1799 to initiate self-government. The legislators were deeply divided politically. The Republicans (antifederalists or “Jeffersonians”), led by Thomas Worthington and Edward Tiffin of Chillicothe, opposed the appointed government headed by the Federalist governor, Arthur St. Clair. They saw it as arbitrary and autocratic and recognized that change could occur only with statehood. To deter the movement, the St. Clair faction in 1801 divided the territory and removed the capital from Chillicothe to Cincinnati. Their actions triggered a violent confrontation led by the antifederalist Michael Baldwin who incited the local rabble-rousers, known as “the Bloodhounds,” to riot in the streets of Chillicothe. Both political unrest and advancing settlement accelerated the Chillicothe faction’s campaign for Ohio statehood.

1562 Clemontville Laurel Road
New Richmond

, OH

The Mount Zion Chapel of the Christian Church was built in 1872 on this hill adjacent to the members’ cemetery outside of Clermontville. The site was part of a two-acre parcel that had been secured from the farm of William R. Clark, Sr. for church and cemetery purposes. The Mount Zion Chapel replaced the Boat Run Christian Church that was organized in 1842 by a sect called the Christians, or the New Lights. Their first meeting house in Clermontville was dedicated on June 4, 1843 and damaged by floods in 1871. Worship was first held in the new frame church with the new name on October 6, 1872 and the church remains active today.

10 E Park Avenue
Columbiana

, OH

Joshua Dixon selected this site in 1805 as the center for Columbiana. The first local post office, established at this museum location in 1809, pioneered free mail delivery in 1837. The museum, an early log home in the village, was moved here and restored in 1975 by community effort for use as a museum and Bicentennial headquarters. The annex was built in 1978.

318 Main St
Coshocton

, OH

William Green, President of the American Federation of Labor from 1924 until death, 1952, began his amazing and strenuous climb to the top rung of labors ladder at age 16, in the Morgan Run Coal Mines in Coshocton County. Born in Coshocton County to parents of English descent, Hugh and Jane Oram Green, he learned their devout Baptist faith. Educated in a one room school house, he studied by coal oil lamp at night and was an avid reader all his life. Married Jennie Mobley, a Coshocton native on 14 April 1892. They were the parents of six children. Held his first union office in Local 379 at 18; then President of Sub-district 6; President of District 6, which included Ohio; Secretary-Treasurer, the United Mine Workers of America; finally, President of the American Federation of Labor. Member of Ohio Senate, 1910-1914; author, Workman’s Compensation Law of Ohio. Member of the Peace Treaty Commission after World War , the Board of International Labor Organization. Advisory Council to Commission on Economic Securtiy, and American Academy of Political and Social Science. Author, Labor and Democracy. Recipient, honorary degrees; Doctor of Industrial Science, Ogelthorpe University and Doctor of Law, Kenyon College. Active Baptist layman; dedicated American; a leader in drive for public education; awarded gold medal for distinguished service in promotion of Industrial Peace by the Roosevelt Memorial Association; received Award of Merit from Secretary of War Robert Patterson for leadership of American workers during World War II; awarded Certificate for Distinguished Service, National Foundation The March of Dimes.