Results for: guernsey
I-77 south of I-70 at SB rest area just past Exit 37
Pleasant City

, OH

Wind increasing in volume. Get no chance to . . These were the last words from the doomed Navy airship Shenandoah, caught in a violent storm and crashing 7 miles southwest of this spot near Ava at dawn, September 3, 1925. Fourteen of its crew were killed. While souvenir hunters stripped the wreckage, a nation questioned the value of huge, rigid dirigibles, the last crashing in 1935. Smaller blimps replaced the dirigible as America’s lighter-than-air sentinels of the sky.

Old Mill Road
Old Washington

, OH

On July 23, 1863, General John Hunt Morgan entered Guernsey County with 600 Confederate cavalrymen, the remnant of a 2,000-man diversionary raiding force that had traversed Kentucky, Indiana, and southern Ohio. Morgan’s forces halted in Old Washington on the morning of July 24 for rest and provisions. Three pursuing Union cavalry units under Brigadier General James M. Shackelford (1st and 3rd Kentucky, 14th Illinois) assembled on Cemetery Hill to the south and began firing on the Confederates in town. The raiders returned fire. In the exchange three Confederates were killed and several wounded. Eight were captured. Outflanked, Morgan proceeded northeast to Columbiana County, where he surrendered two days later. The three Confederate casualties are interred in the cemetery behind this site.

935 Wheeling Avenue
Cambridge

, OH

The first Scottish Rite body of Free Masonry west of the Alleghenies was formed in Cambridge, Ohio, in 1852 by Killian H. Van Rensselaer, an honorary 33rd Degree Mason. He lived in this city from 1851 to 1867. Van Rensselaer was superintendent of construction of the present railroad tunnel west of Cambridge. He died in Cincinnati in 1881 at the age of 80.

Lore City

, OH

By the early 1900s, many species of native wildlife once abundant in Ohio’s woodlands had become scarce or extinct as the forests were cleared for agriculture and industry. Through habitat restoration and reintroduction of native species, animals like the white-tailed deer, Canada goose, wild turkey, beaver, and otter are again part of Ohio’s landscape. Wildlife that once sustained the native inhabitants and early settlers continue to be enjoyed here by anglers, hunters, and trappers, as well as hikers and wildlife observers. The 12,000-acre wildlife area is named for local natural salt licks.

60143 Shannon Run Rd
Quaker City

, OH

Congregations of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), called “meetings”, worshiped in plain meeting houses. On this site stood the last Richland Friends Meeting House, built in 1872. Ninety-four Friends established the meeting in 1826 and it endured for 147 years. The cemetery is where many generations of members of this meeting are buried. The faith, based on pacifism and simplicity, blossomed in the region during the first half of the 19th century. (Continued on other side)

Fletcher Memorial Park, 66715 Old Twenty-One Road
Cambridge

, OH

During the Second World War, the U.S. Army constructed a 131-building hospital on level farmland a quarter mile northwest of this marker. The army built the facility as a 1,520-bed hospital in the winter and spring of 1942-’43. It was later expanded to 168 buildings with a 2,000-bed capacity, including a German POW camp for 234 prisoners engaged in hospital work. Between June 1943 and March 1946, when the facility closed, 17,608 veterans were treated here, most having returned with injuries received in the European or Pacific theaters of war. Convalescence and rehabilitation were the hospital’s primary missions. Most patients returned to active duty when they recovered. After the war, the facility became the Cambridge State Hospital, which treated mentally ill and developmentally disabled Ohioans until 2008. Thereafter, the facility became the privately-operated Cambridge Behavioral Hospital and the state-operated Cambridge Developmental Center.