Remarkable Ohio

Serpent Mound Marker
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6-67 Western Reserve Eclectic Institute (Hiram College) Faculty Photograph

1062_4803.jpg 6-67 The marker 10/27/2013Thumbnails6-67 Western Reserve Eclectic Institute (Hiram College) Faculty Photograph6-67 The marker 10/27/2013Thumbnails6-67 Western Reserve Eclectic Institute (Hiram College) Faculty Photograph6-67 The marker 10/27/2013Thumbnails6-67 Western Reserve Eclectic Institute (Hiram College) Faculty Photograph

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Marker Details

Title, side A
Admiral Ernest J. King
Title, side B
Same
Address
2750 Ashland Avenue
Lorain, 44052
Location
Adm. King High School, 2750 Ashland Avenue
Latitude
41.4463500
Longitude
-82.1896000

Picture Details

Title
Western Reserve Eclectic Institute (Hiram College) Faculty Photograph
Caption
An 8" x 10" (20.3 x 25.4 cm) photograph of the first faculty of the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute (now Hiram College) shows (left to right): Principal Amos Sutton Hayden, Thomas Munnell, Charles Wilber, and Almeda A. Booth. Amos Sutton Hayden (1813-1880) of Youngstown was the first principal and served from 1850 until 1857. Thomas Munnell (1823-1898) taught history. Charles Wilbur (d. 1891) taught natural sciences and left Hiram to attend Williams College with James A. Garfield in 1854. Wilbur graduated and became a geologist. Almeda A. Booth (1823-1875) of Nelson, Ohio, was an English teacher and principal of the Ladies' Department from 1851 until 1866. She taught James A. Garfield and remained close friends with him until her death. The Disciples of Christ founded the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute as a nonsectarian, coeducational preparatory school in 1849. Once the denomination's fellowship in the Western Reserve decided to establish the institution, a contentious debate over its location arose. After thirteen rounds of voting, Hiram was chosen as the site of the institution. The school opened on November 27, 1850 despite the fact that the building was not yet completed. Many of the students came from the surrounding farms and villages of the Western Reserve, but Hiram soon gained a national reputation and students began arriving from other states. The school attained collegiate rank in 1867 and changed its name to Hiram College.