Remarkable Ohio

Serpent Mound Marker
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12-41 Descendants of Wm. Pittenger at the marker's dedication, Aug. 2, 2014

106329_144446.jpg Thumbnails12-41 Virginia &Curt Glenn with the marker at the dedication, Aug. 2, 2014Thumbnails12-41 Virginia &Curt Glenn with the marker at the dedication, Aug. 2, 2014Thumbnails12-41 Virginia &Curt Glenn with the marker at the dedication, Aug. 2, 2014Thumbnails12-41 Virginia &Curt Glenn with the marker at the dedication, Aug. 2, 2014Thumbnails12-41 Virginia &Curt Glenn with the marker at the dedication, Aug. 2, 2014Thumbnails12-41 Virginia &Curt Glenn with the marker at the dedication, Aug. 2, 2014Thumbnails12-41 Virginia &Curt Glenn with the marker at the dedication, Aug. 2, 2014

Side A: William Pittenger Congressional Medal of Honor, 1863. The General at Union Station in Chattanooga, Tennessee (circa 1907). Born in Knoxville in 1840 and reared at a farm in New Somerset, William Pittenger mustered into the 2nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under a 90-day enlistment, in 1861. He fought at the First Battle of Bull Run and was the war correspondent for the Steubenville Herald. After reenlisting, he participated in the ill-fated Andrews Raid of 1862. While attempting to disrupt enemy supply lines, the raiders stole the Confederate locomotive "The General." After being chased north, they were captured. (Continued on other side) Side B: Same. (Continued from other side) Eight of the twenty-two captured raiders were executed as spies and the remainder languished in prison. After being paroled in 1863, Pittenger was presented the fifth Congressional Medal of Honor by Secretary of War Edwin Stanton and was promoted to the rank of lieutenant. He was discharged from the Army due to poor health and returned home to preach at the New Somerset Methodist Church and recount his experiences in several books, including Daring and Suffering: A History of the Great Railroad Adventure.