Remarkable Ohio

Serpent Mound Marker

Home / Franklin County / 69-25 Jesse Owens [11]

  • 69-25 Jesse Owens  (Side A) 69-25 Jesse Owens (Side A)
  • 69-25 Jesse Owens (Side B) 69-25 Jesse Owens (Side B)
  • 69-25 Jesse Owens 69-25 Jesse Owens
  • 69-25 Jesse Owens 69-25 Jesse Owens
  • 69-25 Jesse Owens 69-25 Jesse Owens
  • 69-25 #69-25 Jesse Owens Statue New location 69-25 #69-25 Jesse Owens Statue New location
  • 69-25 #69-25 Jesse Owens Statue original marker placement is now this statue 69-25 #69-25 Jesse Owens Statue original marker placement is now this statue
  • 69-25 #69-25 Jesse Owens Statue close to marker stadium 69-25 #69-25 Jesse Owens Statue close to marker stadium
  • 69-25 #69-25 Jesse Owens Statue 5 gold medals 69-25 #69-25 Jesse Owens Statue 5 gold medals
  • 69-25 Back of marker, with the Schottenstein Center in the background 69-25 Back of marker, with the Schottenstein Center in the background
  • 69-25 Owens Marker, located in front of Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium 69-25 Owens Marker, located in front of Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium
Title, side A
Jesse Owens
Text, side A
James Cleveland Owens was born in Alabama in 1913 and moved with his family to Cleveland at age nine. An elementary school teacher recorded his name "Jesse" when he said "J.C." It became the name he used for the rest of his life. Owens' dash to the Olympics began with track and field records in junior high and high school. Owens chose The Ohio State University without scholarship, supporting himself by working many jobs, including one in the University Libraries. The pinnacle of his sports career came at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, where he won four gold medals, frustrating Adolf Hitler's attempt to showcase Aryan superiority. After his return, Owens found work as a playground director in Cleveland beginning his life work with underprivileged youth.
Text, side B
Jesse Owens served as the personal representative of President Eisenhower at the 1956 Olympic Games, and, in 1976, President Ford presented him with the Medal of Freedom, the highest honor the U.S. can bestow on a civilian. When Owens died in 1980, President Carter added his voice to tributes from around the world: "Perhaps no athlete better symbolized the human struggle against tyranny, poverty, and racial bigotry. His personal triumphs as a world-class athlete and record holder were the prelude to a career devoted to helping others. His work with young athletes, as an unofficial ambassador overseas, and as a spokesman for freedom are a rich legacy to his fellow Americans."
Address
2450 Fred Taylor Drive-Marker has been temporarily removed
Columbus, OH
Location
Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium, 2450 Fred Taylor Drive
Coordinates
Latitude: 40.012253, Longitude: -83.028534.
Google map: