Remarkable Ohio

Serpent Mound Marker

Home / Defiance County / 2-20 Spemica Lawba-Johnny Logan [8]

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  • 2-20 The Setting 2-20 The Setting
  • 2-20 For Your Information #1 2-20 For Your Information #1
  • 2-20 For Your Information #2 2-20 For Your Information #2
  • 2-20 My favorite berry is the liberry 2-20 My favorite berry is the liberry
  • 2-20 Johnny Logan Marker 2-20 Johnny Logan Marker
  • 2-20 Johnny Logan Marker Side A 2-20 Johnny Logan Marker Side A
Title, side A
Spemica Lawba-Johnny Logan
Text, side A
In September 1786, Captain Benjamin Logan of Kentucky captured a young Indian boy during a raid across the Ohio River on the Machachac tribe towns of the Shawnee nation. Upon returning to Kentucky, Captain Logan made the 14 year old boy part of his family until he was forced by treaty to return him to his native people. From the period of residence in Kentucky to the time of his death, Johnny Logan, as he was named, was a friend of the United States. Following the declaration of war against England in 1812, he joined the American service. He was employed by the Indian Agent John Johnston at Piqua to help evacuate Ohio women and children living near Fort Wayne. The siege of that fort was later lifted by the combined force of Kentucky and Ohio troops under the command of General William Henry Harrison. [continued on other side]
Text, side B
[continued from other side] In November 1812, General Harrison directed Logan to take a small party ahead of General James Winchester's left wing to scout the area near the Rapids of the Maumee River. Encountering a larger enemy force, Logan's party retreated and was accused of disloyalty by General Price, second in command to Winchester. Indignant, Logan left with Captain Johnny and Bright Horn to prove his innocence. They were, however, captured near Turkeyfoot Creek by British sympathizer Potawatamie Chief Winnemac and Matthew Elliot, son of a British Indian Agent. During their escape, four of the enemy, including Winnemac and Elliot were killed. Bright Horn and Logan were wounded, but Logan's wound was severe. He died on November 25, 1812. Army officers carried Logan's body six miles to Fort Defiance where he was buried with full military honors, the only Indian to receive that recognition in Ohio.
Address
Corner of Washington & Fort Streets
Defiance, OH 43512
Location
Fort Defiance Park Land
Coordinates
Latitude: 41.287633, Longitude: -84.356950.
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